Archives par mot-clef : baby

Milk capsules for babies. What else ?


Nestlé brings together two of its most successful marketing campaigns and addresses mums: after baby formula milk and coffee capsules, a bottle-feeding kit has now been launched in the Swiss and Liechtenstein markets. While mum and dad make a cup of coffee (or even tea, with the Special-T machine), their baby can also be drawn in by the sounds of the food giant through its BabyNes bottle.

According to Nestlé’s marketing team, it appears that there’s no set age for becoming addicted to a marketing concept: “When she hears the sound of the machine, she knows that the bottle’s ready. She associates the sound of the machine with the bottle.” (testimony from Aïcha, head of the Finance department at Nestlé and mother to an 8-month-old girl). Nestlé therefore wins over all the family.

Children’s clothing chain Petit Bateau accused of sexism


In June 2011, the French children¹s label Petit Bateau unveiled its new range of bodies. And in doing so, it sparked a scandal: the clothes were printed with a list of adjectives characterising the two sexes, with girls being « cute and funny » and boys being « strong and determined »… The use of such sexist clichés angered many Internet users, who invaded the brand’s Facebook page.

In Petit Bateau’s universe, little girls should be « pretty, headstrong, funny, sweet, eager, flirty, loving, cute, elegant, beautiful » whilst little boys should be « courageous, strong, proud, robust, valiant, cunning, smart, determined, mischievous, cool ». It’s a rather chauvinist description of the two sexes, according to Elise Fimbel, the first Internet user who took to the brand’s Facebook wall to convey her outrage: « I’ve just seen the photo of your sexist bodies which spell out the worst of stereotypes. It’s pathetic. If retro is the fashion, it doesn’t make sense to me to take a big step backwards.« 
Marine Baudin-Sarlet

Huggies makes us laugh about motherhood


Huggies chooses humour to catch its target audience’s attention: they understand that parents and future parents want to make light of their difficulties (vomit, sleepless nights, etc.) as much as possible.

The campaign, created by JWT Entertainment, started out as a stand-up comedy show for pregnant women, focused on the realities of parenthood. The show brought together famous names in British comedy on the stage and pregnant celebrities in the audience. The night also gave marketers the opportunity to collect humorous testimonies from ordinary parents.

Sketches were then gradually broadcast via a dedicated website as well as the brand’s YouTube and Facebook pages. The release of only one video per week (since the 30th of August 2010) allows for the development of visitor loyalty. The short length of each video (3-5 minutes) matches the limited free time in young parents’ busy schedules. Advertising banners reinforced this operation.

More than 7,600 people “liked” it on Facebook, and many blogs have mentioned the event.

This campaign strongly contrasts with those often promoted by the sector in that it does not deal with an idealised vision of parenthood. Huggies has thereby proven they can understand the challenges faced by young parents and tailor their advertising to match that.

The Nestlé Baby Club, personalised nutrition advice


Nestlé cares for mothers. In 2006, the brand created a website providing expert nutritional advice for kids. The website now registers 460,000 subscribers and receives an average of 159,000 unique visitors and 6,300 new subscriptions per month.

On the menu: a nutrition navigator. This interactive programme gives information on the nutritional needs of a baby for each age category. It also provides a downloadable guide with menu suggestions for two weeks. Some other sections are available such as everyday life with baby, mums’ tricks, advice from experts, games… and downloadable Nestlé coupons.

The programme also indicates what the growing-up milestones of the child are according to their age (like picking up and holding objects, for example).

The Babycook Book, recipes for babies by Beaba


The famous manufacturer of food processors has created a cook book written by a young cook and dad (David Rathgeber) to help mums prepare diversified foods for their children.

The book provides information on the nutritional benefits of fruits and veggies as well as tips on how to choose the best ones and how to cook them. Compotes, soups, purées, jams as well as more elaborate desserts like crumbles are featured. The recipe book encourages toddlers’ awareness of new tastes and textures.

A smart way for Beaba to add value to its products while developing the culinary imagination of its customers.

Total offers baby kits in petrol stations


Each summer since 1994 Total has teamed up with the Huggies and Hipp Bio-Organic brands to offer baby kits to parents.

The dedicated website hosting the operation proposes a game where you can ride a motorbike in front of moving scenery.
By pressing on the left and right arrows of your computer you can stop at different places, where you discover the petrol stations taking part in the operation as well as a travel diary with ideas of nursery rhymes, games, etc.

The baby kits displayed in the petrol stations are presented on the website. There are two different kinds, both distributed in all Total petrol stations, one for 0 to 12-month-olds and one for 13 to 24-month-old babies.

Pampers turns the Tuileries Garden into a kindergarten


Pampers and the French agency Passage Piéton turned the Tuileries Garden in Paris into a huge kindergarten one weekend in September 2010. This was an opportunity to present the new Dry Max technology to parents.

The Pampers Village – a 700 square meter installation – displayed a lot of workshops: body awareness, massage and relaxation, games for kids, the “Only for dads” workshop, food tasting, etc.

These activities perfectly suited parents who received plenty of gifts: 300 baby wipe packs, 2,000 nappies, Ariel Derma Sensitive washing liquid, Fisher-Price rattles and Gillette Fusion razors.

A total of 3,800 visitors came to this Pampers Village weekend.