Category Archives: Brands Analysis

L’Oréal: a success story in international marketing to women


Established in 130 countries across five continents, L’Oréal group’s international success represents an international marketing model based on skill, knowledge and an unshakeable reputation. How has L’Oréal created this image and reputation? How has the group won over women around the world?

Dove: the perfect success story in advertising


In 2004 Dove launched a ground breaking worldwide advertising campaign in the beauty industry. The brand created a new way to address their public which aimed to be “real” by getting rid of the complexes that beauty product consumers suffer from. Around 10 years on, how have Dove’s campaigns changed? What lessons can we take away?

2004

Why do brands need media muses?


“In reality, women are more ‘real,’ and not as perfect as Adriana Karembeu. People need reality, they need truth.” These are the words of Nicolas Chomette, head of Black & Gold, a design and strategy company. He adds, “Sometimes we wonder whether the use of muses simply hides a brand’s lack of imagination, and perhaps even their laziness. Have they run out of ideas?” (1) Some brands, like Dove in 2012, have chosen to use consumers as muses. Is it due to a lack of imagination or a way to increase sales? Why do brands use muses?

Thierry Mugler makes its customers feel like stars


« If without perfume, we are nothing, without  image, perfume is nothing, » believes Alain Montandon, professor emeritus of General and Comparative Literature. (1) More than just a simple fragrance, perfume evokes a feeling and an image. Using it is therefore very symbolic for women. Fragrances are surrounded by connotations that brands carefully build and manipulate.

To perfect the relationship between consumers and their perfumes, Thierry Mugler pioneered a unique loyalty strategy.

Du Pareil au même: « Made for kids! »


Born from the imagination of theatre designer Simon Bénarousse, who found children’s clothes too simple and boring, the brand “Du Pareil au même” (translation: “six of one, (and) half a dozen of the other”) has always been defined by fun and colourful products. After the brand’s first store opened in 1986, the French success story is now really taking shape. A baby line was launched in 1994 and then a line of shoes in the 2000s, the club card (loyalty program) was launched in 2004 and events take place regularly. By 2013 the brand was present across 32 countries, had 2.5 million subscribers to its loyalty program and opened its 600th store. (1) How has the brand changed the clothing market? How has it developed its strategy? How does it communicate to mums?

The children’s clothing market

As the fastest growing sector of the apparel market, the children’s sector is supported by positive structural factors, including a growing target population, the fact that children change size and shoe size every 6 months until they hit adolescence, the rise in the average age of women when they have their first child (stronger buying power), etc. However, according to the Xerfi institute, it seems to be struggling in the economic context of 2013. Specialists brands are competing with extensions of adult brands (Zara Kids, Mexx Kids, Gap Kids, etc.) who are trying to gain customers from the child sector. (2) This is why DPAM re-launched its marketing strategy, expanding its digital offer amongst other initiatives.

Yves Rocher, the Botanical Beauty Expert


« Our greatest achievement was not discovering the properties of plants, but making them available to everyone. » So believes Yves Rocher, the famous founder of the botanical beauty company of the same name. He was guided by two key aims: accessible beauty and scientific innovation using plants.

Fascinated by active ingredients in plants, the young Yves Rocher started his business at 28 years old with a ‘lesser flower’ based cream. At that time, in 1959, the beauty market was still dominated by the elite, so the young businessman decided to make cosmetics accessible to all women. (2) This is how mail-order selling started, publishing ads in national newspapers and popular magazines such as “Ici Paris” and “France Dimanche. » (1) The success was immediate and the brand rapidly gained momentum in France.  With a client base of around 5,000 addresses, the brand now attracts over 30 million customers worldwide.

Gender Marketing encounters: Thierry Maurice


Interview with Thierry Maurice, CEO of the dating website appart-ages.com

Womenology: Older women represent a very important market for marketers, what are the expectations of this target audience in your opinion?

Yes, because they are more likely to be regaining control over their lives, which inevitably involves the « consumption » of beauty products, travel, dating sites, etc … Older women are not what they were, they don’t want to give up anything, nothing, except giving up… but there is one area in which they don’t express themselves enough, love and sex, despite how far it has come in recent years.

Clarins: « Pregnancy marks the most beautiful days of your life. »


Be reassured, informed, understood, guided, more beautiful. These are the main needs of expectant mothers. Although responding to all these needs is not an easy task for companies, one brand, among others, has established a reputation for itself in the relatively niche market of pregnant women. That brand is Clarins. What factors have caused this success? What is the « baby » strategy of this cosmetics brand?

The long established relationship between Clarins and future mothers

In 1993, Clarins was already making an impact on the cosmetics for expectant mothers market when it published the book « Pregnancy, the most beautiful days of your life. » The brand was launched; Clarins established itself as the brand leader for beauty advice during pregnancy.

Gender Marketing encounters: Salim Azar


Salim Azar

Interview with Salim Azar, Professor at the University of Cergy Pontoise

Womenology: What are the characteristics of a brand hoping to address a female audience?

The emergence of new sociological, political, philosophical and artistic trends has caused new approaches to consumption and brands. Beyond a symbolic and emotional view of brands, self-expression has become a decisive factor in consumer choices and preferences. Movements such as feminism and postmodernism have highlighted the importance of the consumption of symbols and feelings, in a subjective and hyper-real context. Feminism highlights women’s day to day experiences, and postmodernism emphasizes the importance of hedonism and pleasure in life. By capitalizing on these movements, it is now widely accepted in marketing that consumers no longer choose products just for functional uses, but also for what they represent. Brands become de facto capital because they act mainly in this way. In my research, based on an anthropomorphic brand approach, I am interested in analysing the traits and characteristics of “gendered” brands. I found that brands, like humans, have a sex, a gender and a sexual orientation. These tools help managers to improve their ability to address all women.

Pampers’s know how attracts mums


Victor Mills, American chemical engineer who worked at Procter & Gamble Co in the 50s, revolutionized the baby market when he invented the disposable nappy. Inspired by his own experiences with his grandchildren, the inventor created the Pampers brand, known for its innovation. It was the first company to replace nappy pins with tape, and then the first to develop extendable ties, absorbent gels and multipacks (1970), but its most famous achievement, Baby Dry, came out in the 90s. (1) Thanks to this new technology, nappies became more absorbent and parents’ lives were transformed.

Let’s take a closer look at this market leader. What is its marketing strategy, its advantage over competitors and its market vision?

Innovation gains consumer trust

With its knack for launching innovative new products on the nappy market, Pampers has established itself as the brand to beat, and is now one of the brands most trusted by mums (Study Millward Brown, TrustR , 2011). (2)

Investing around $2 billion in research each year, P&G bases their Pampers brand strategy totally on innovation and technology. In fact, in March 2013, the Pampers Research and Development centre in Schwalbach, near Frankfurt in Germany was more than happy to open its doors to French journalists and bloggers. (3)