Archives par mot-clef : couple

CafeMom website creates an indicator of mums’ quality of life


CafeMom’s indicator came into being because of an observation: as mums are generally the bond that cements family relations, their mood greatly influences the overall frame of mind of the household.
This is why, in summer 2010, the site decided to create the MomIndex, a bi-annual index that measures the quality of life of American mums.

The aim of this new type of index was to show that mums’ satisfaction in life doesn’t just depend on their level of education or their salary, but on human factors above all else. CafeMom identified 5 major themes that influence mums’ wellbeing: themselves, their children, their relationships, their financial situation, and the world in which they live.

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« Happy » infidelity?


Whilst Gleeden.com is the “number one extramarital dating site developed by women”, aufeminin.com’s infidelity forum, created in 2003, mirrors the behavioural and social evolution of women.

The evolution is behavioural because from a “passive” infidelity (where the women suffer due to being victims of it), women can now be seen communicating more often about an “active” infidelity, one in which they have an active role.

The evolution is social because the points of reference that women need to construct their lives have changed: religious and political spheres have less of an influence than before; women construct their points of reference themselves or with their community. Isolation is no more.

Paradoxically, writing has liberated speech.

Anonymity enables people to overcome social, family and religious pressure. The mask has a liberating effect, while transparency and self-esteem develop on major social networks.

While confessions once consisted of two elements, expressed vertically and destined for an authority, they have become collective, horizontal, almost about one’s identity.

Mums are satisfied with their love lives but would like more sex!


A study of American mums, led by CafeMom, looked into their relationships with their husbands. The result? While mums are satisfied with their partners overall, they miss the frequency with which they had sex before the arrival of children…

The first result from the study: 80% of mothers are very satisfied with their partners. The subjects that cause arguments are rare and isolated (e.g. disagreement over how to reprimand a child because of a poor school report, temporary financial problems, etc.). Only 12% wouldn’t set up home with their partner if they were to do it all again, and 8% retrospectively claim that they would have preferred to have lived alone… but without giving up having children: only 1% of mums say they preferred the life they had before becoming a mum!

A growing number of people in their fifties are seeking divorce


Once the children have fled the family nest, more and more unhappily married women are taking the plunge and divorcing. This new category of singletons, who want to make the most of their newfound freedom, should not be neglected in terms of their consumption potential.

According to Agora Vox, almost 5 in one thousand couples divorce after 30 years of living together (compared to less than one in one thousand in 1972) and women are the ones behind two thirds of these separations. It was unimaginable a few decades ago when it was deemed too late to start over again: “as you make your bed you must lie in it”, goes the saying.

Nowadays, resignation is out of place: as many people in their 50s are divorcing as those in their 30s. In part, because divorced women are no longer stigmatised as much as they were when divorce was considered a deadly sin against Christian morals. But also because they are more independent financially (most of them work), and therefore aren’t afraid of being penniless if they leave their partner.A growing number of people in their fifties are seeking divorce

Once the children have fled the family nest, more and more unhappily married women are taking the plunge and divorcing. This new category of singletons, who want to make the most of their newfound freedom, should not be neglected in terms of their consumption potential.

According to Agora Vox, almost 5 in one thousand couples divorce after 30 years of living together (compared to less than one in one thousand in 1972) and women are the ones behind two thirds of these separations. It was unimaginable a few decades ago when it was deemed too late to start over again: “as you make your bed you must lie in it”, goes the saying.

Nowadays, resignation is out of place: as many people in their 50s are divorcing as those in their 30s. In part, because divorced women are no longer stigmatised as much as they were when divorce was considered a deadly sin against Christian morals. But also because they are more independent financially (most of them work), and therefore aren’t afraid of being penniless if they leave their partner.

Disputes over household chores are a main factor in the separation of 1 in 4 French couples


A March Smartdate study of men and women in France shows that when couples fight about household tasks like cleaning and repair, it can often lead to trouble.
23% of those polled wrote that disputes about chores were the main factor in their last separation. What’s more, this is almost equal to the amount of breakups occuring due to adultery (24%).
Women and men could perhaps find it easier to compromise when doing chores by separating tasks according to willingness and ability: another Smartdate study shows that lots of men are willing to do things like ironing clothing which women like less, while women are more ready to do the laundry, something the men like less.