Category Archives: Differences men and women

Lacoste Women – they’ve got bite


A polo shirt with an embroidered crocodile. This is the hallmark of the legendary French company Lacoste. Officially born in 1933, the famous shirts adorned with their badge is based on the story of the international tennis champion René Lacoste – dubbed the « alligator » and « crocodile » in reference to his tenacity on the court. Following the diversification of his offer, the brand has managed to develop its image.

#WorldCup: women lace up their boots


The World Cup is without a doubt one of the most popular topics of conversation brought to us this early summer. But what attitude will women bear in regards to this traditionally masculine sport? The aufeminin.com website and its Womenology lab have led a survey with 782 respondents in France and in Germany. Here are the results! (1)

And 1,2,3…86% of women watch football

Contrarily to the macho tweets that one can read on Twitter, men are not the only people to like football. 86% of the women interviewed stated that they watch football matches on TV. If however for the majority, this practice proves only to be occasional (64%), 23% clearly affirm that they “love football and watch every match of the season”. German women prove to be especially passionate, with 26% of the respondents loving football, compared with only 17% of French women deeming the same commitment.

Yes, women watch X-rated movies too


In the 1970’s, pornographic movies were broadcasted without restraint in cinemas; however, with the introduction of the Giscard law in 1975, the general view began to change towards these erotic productions. By 1990, almost all pornographic cinema halls had disappeared, this also being the result of other factors, such as the invention of the VHS cassette tape. Eroticism has thus moved from the public sphere into the private sphere. With the rise of the internet, the pornographic world has seen a rebirth amongst the shelter of households or behind computer screens, in which one can watch whatever they please under an incognito disguise. Do men and women watch the same amount of porn? Do they watch these films for the same reasons? Does the newer generation of women appreciate pornographic films more than their elders? The Womenology marketing lab from the aufeminin.com group has led an exclusive survey with 2302 respondents in order to answer these questions. (1)

The keys to online shopping for women


« Purchasing, especially online, allows people to feel part of a large community with values at the heart of it, brand values.” These are the words of sociologist Stéphane Hugon whose doctoral research focused on “The social construction of online identity”. (1)

Through the development of online shopping, individuals are discovering a new purchasing experience, one that’s digital, rich in information and community-based. However, do men and women demonstrate the same behaviour when it comes to online shopping?

The democratisation of online shopping

In January 2013, Ifop (the French Institute of Public Opinion) published a survey comparing online shopping and in-store purchases, the results of which highlighted the advantages of online sales sites compared to their “physical” competitors. According to the study, pure plays are no longer considered by shoppers to be marginal players. When they have the choice, around a quarter of French people – and up to 32% of those in the upper socio-professional category – prefer to shop online rather than at traditional distributors.

Are women fighting against stereotypes or internalising them? (1/2)


In society, when we talk about « equality » between men and women, we often think about salaries, careers, or who does the household chores. We don’t however talk so much about equality amongst children when it comes to play, cultural activities and sports. However, the way that children are educated has a lot of influence on the way that gender representations are passed on. Such is evident in the latest film by Guillaume Gallienne « Les Garçons et Guillaume à table! » In cinemas 20th November 2013.

Since female emancipation, people, and women in particular, have continued to fight the injustices of gender relations.

However, stereotypes still exist in society, and are ingrained from a very young age. How can this be explained? This question was asked in a survey conducted in October 2013 on 1284 women by Womenology for aufeminin.com. (1) What kind of stereotypes still exist in family education? Do mums educate girls and boys in the same way? Why do boys rarely play with dolls?

Gender Marketing encounters: Thierry Maurice


Interview with Thierry Maurice, CEO of the dating website appart-ages.com

Womenology: Older women represent a very important market for marketers, what are the expectations of this target audience in your opinion?

Yes, because they are more likely to be regaining control over their lives, which inevitably involves the « consumption » of beauty products, travel, dating sites, etc … Older women are not what they were, they don’t want to give up anything, nothing, except giving up… but there is one area in which they don’t express themselves enough, love and sex, despite how far it has come in recent years.

Gender Marketing encounters: Salim Azar


Salim Azar

Interview with Salim Azar, Professor at the University of Cergy Pontoise

Womenology: What are the characteristics of a brand hoping to address a female audience?

The emergence of new sociological, political, philosophical and artistic trends has caused new approaches to consumption and brands. Beyond a symbolic and emotional view of brands, self-expression has become a decisive factor in consumer choices and preferences. Movements such as feminism and postmodernism have highlighted the importance of the consumption of symbols and feelings, in a subjective and hyper-real context. Feminism highlights women’s day to day experiences, and postmodernism emphasizes the importance of hedonism and pleasure in life. By capitalizing on these movements, it is now widely accepted in marketing that consumers no longer choose products just for functional uses, but also for what they represent. Brands become de facto capital because they act mainly in this way. In my research, based on an anthropomorphic brand approach, I am interested in analysing the traits and characteristics of “gendered” brands. I found that brands, like humans, have a sex, a gender and a sexual orientation. These tools help managers to improve their ability to address all women.

Lego and gender marketing: a strategy under construction


After several years of research on behavioral differences in boys and girls, in January 2012, the Lego brand launched a new range for girls; Lego Friends. How does this strategy work? What affinity has Lego established with girls since its origins? Let’s look back at the brand campaigns that marked great years for the brand.

Lego Friends: a new world for girls

« Heartlake City » is the name given to the imaginary city of toys created by Lego for girls. In this fun and colorful landscape, five friends do their favorite activities: decorating their homes, going to the hairdresser’s, preparing food, and working as vets or karate instructors…

Stephen Knapp, Marketing Director for Lego France explains how design varies in the range: « We interviewed girls and found that for them, the experience starts before the construction itself, they have different needs to boys. They want to make their own world, create models all by themselves (…). The figurines are slightly larger, closer to reality, still to construct, but designed to appeal to girls, who didn’t identify with the boy figurines. The figures are characters whose stories girls are invited to discover, their personalities, their worlds, and of course the friendship that brings them together. «  (2)

Women and Innovation


Philippe Guilbert

Innovation is now crucial across all economic sectors. Every year over 30,000 new products are launched in European stores, but less than 30% of them are still around 3 years after their launch. The Toluna survey for the 2012 LSA innovation awards focuses on women and innovation and might shake up some common beliefs!

In fact, 80.2% of French women say that they have bought new products this year, compared to only 76.1 % of men. Even in the very large consumer innovation category, women have almost caught up with men (6.9% and 7.6% respectively). Women are not put off by innovation, quite the contrary.

They also have a broader view of innovation: they don’t just cite High-Tech as one of the most innovative sectors in FMCG, but also Health and Beauty, fresh dairy products, DIY, household appliances etc. To find out more about such innovations, women prefer seeing them in store (58%) rather than in the media (49%), whereas men have the opposite preference.

Men / women, which is the head chef? – Video


Are clichés still relevant? Do men embellish reality? Do women voluntarily demean the role of men in the kitchen to keep the « pan power? » 2412 people in a relationship responded to the large survey (1) cooked by marmiton.org in partnership with Lesieur.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=euc1pmpoQUg

1 Survey conducted in France from September 1 to October 1, 2012

Total Number of Respondents: 1,524 women in a relationship and 888 men in a relationship.