Archives par mot-clef : luxe

Dior’s video tutorials


Dior’s cosmetics website offers make-up application videos to its users. A wide range of tips provided by experts are there to help women apply their make-up as haute couture professionals, from the “Dior Application Techniques” (complexion, eyes, lips) to the ”Dior Looks”.

The website and videos use all the haute couture codes: music, colours, catwalk strutting and clothes of the make-up artists.

The videos give clear step-by-step explanations for each make-up technique. Each step has its own video on the presentation page. Direct access is provided to the Dior products used in the videos which can then be ordered in one click.

These videos are also available on various websites dedicated to women such as Aufeminin or Mademoiselle Boudoir and on video websites such as YouTube.

Lady Blue by Dior, a short film starring Marion Cotillard


Lady Blue is much more than a simple commercial, it is a real 16-minute short film directed by David Lynch for the Lady Dior bag. This film was released in May 2010, and it is the third and last but one chapter of the Lady Dior campaign starring French actress Marion Cotillard. It follows the Lady Noir (Lady Black) directed by Olivier Dahan, and the Lady Rouge (Lady Red) where Marion Cotillard sings a song written and performed by the band Franz Ferdinand.
This massive Internet campaign was designed by the Le Fil agency. It was first presented at the Cannes Film Festival and then to the press. It is now promoted on several blogs (Le Modalogue, PaperBlog), specialised websites (Allociné, Puretrend, Vogue, Le Parisien) and on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, making each release of these short films a real event.


Shanghai is the beacon city for the third opus of the series starring a man with Asian features. China represents 27% of the luxury market and this number keeps on rising.
Choosing the Internet has enabled Dior to reach an audience that’s fond of new technologies and to rejuvenate the brand’s image. According to consumers, “Youngsters appreciate the short film. Without it, the brand would look too stuffy for them”

The cinematographic and aesthetic approaches helped embed this online content into the luxury universe: “The photography, the colours, the atmosphere, everything invites us into a phantasmagorical universe immersing us into the luxury world”. The public points out how colour has allowed the bag to integrate in the short artistic films.
The Lady Blue campaign accompanied the launch of the 2011 line in the renovated Dior store in Shanghaï. The website also provided a virtual exhibition, while advertising banners on MSN China and the Sina portal reinforced the operation.
The campaign cost between 2 and 4 million Euros with a striking result: the pages received more than 100 million views while the official website received 1 million visitors.

Jimmy Choo treasure hunt in the streets of London


The Jimmy Choo shoe brand has used the new possibilities offered by a new generation of social networks based on geolocation. Foursquare allows you to find out where the members of your network are, at anytime of the day, thanks to the GPS integrated in smartphones. You can therefore meet up with a friend who happens to be just a few blocks away from you.

Based on this principle, last April, Jimmy Choo launched a treasure hunt in London (Choo Hunt).

The idea was to track down a brand representative who checked in on Foursquare into some of the most famous places in London. He published hints and tips about his hideaway on Facebook and Twitter. This representative carried a pair of Jimmy Choo shoes with him: if you could track the shoes down and catch them while he was still checked in at a venue, then they were yours.

Two Facebook and Twitter pages were created for the occasion.

Kate Moss’s Longchamp bag, a digital work of art


The ad campaign is called Tell Me About Her. It’s also the name of the website Longchamp launched for the occasion. The brand asked its customers to imagine Kate Moss as a bag and to post a short message (70 characters max) describing her.
This Twiller was introduced by a video that said: « Kate has dreamt up the perfect bag for you. Now it’s your turn. Imagine… If Kate were a bag, close to you, anywhere, anytime. Tell us the story and be the first to win Kate’s bag. How? Post a short message about Kate. »
The best messages were regularly compiled with singing videos. Most of them used puns on the name Kate or on the theme of the bag (« When I first met Kate, she got carried away »). The public could vote for the best messages.

1001 ways to tie and wear a Hermès scarf


Hermès’ partnership with Spill agency allowed a younger target audience to be reached. The I Love My Scarf campaign offered a unique chance for the brand to renew itself.

The website displays new ways to wear the scarf: it’s now an accessory for bags, dresses, skirts or it can even be worn as a belt… creativity and original uses are aplenty!

The Hermès website looks a lot like Burberry’s Art of the Trench site with one difference: you cannot post your own photos. This is quite surprising for this kind of creative photo gallery. Therefore the website is not fully optimising the Web 2.0 technologies.
Since then, the limited-edition line of scarves shown on the website – found only at Colette in Paris – has been commercialised.