“Without the internet, I wouldn’t be the woman that I am today”


A meeting with Capucine, the creator of the blog Babillages

How did you think of the idea to create Babillages?

I was 19 and a student in communication and journalism. I started my first internship in women’s press, mainly in the beauty sections. That gave me the desire to do this job so I started a blog on beauty. At this moment in time, I hadn’t really had the opportunity to write in the magazines which I worked for, so the blog seemed to me an obvious way to prove that I was interested in this industry. That’s when I got myself into the game. The internet users are really connected with each other over it. The blog was no longer an advertising space to my potential employers. That was 7 years ago now! Babillages is a great adventure. I have grown up with my blog and the blog has grown too. I am also in the middle of working on a new version of Babillages which will mark a true turning point in my professional life. I want to put forward a much richer experience which I hope would please my readers! My blog will in effect transform itself into a real website…But that’s all I’m going to tell you, patience!

“Push up your chest!”


Summer is arriving, and already your breasts are attracting attention, whether you reveal them discreetly or openly. Emblems of femininity, breasts are simultaneously, objects of desire, stallions of youth, feeding organs, a question of politics… “No other body part has been fetishized as much as women’s breasts; they are seen as the most immediate object of desire in contemporary America. Omnipresent, they live in our imagination as the most powerful and totemic symbol of femininity” writes the journalist Alex Kuczynski, author of ‘Beauty Junkies’ (2006) (1). But how does the history breasts teach us about the evolution of women’s lives?

#WorldCup: women lace up their boots


The World Cup is without a doubt one of the most popular topics of conversation brought to us this early summer. But what attitude will women bear in regards to this traditionally masculine sport? The aufeminin.com website and its Womenology lab have led a survey with 782 respondents in France and in Germany. Here are the results! (1)

And 1,2,3…86% of women watch football

Contrarily to the macho tweets that one can read on Twitter, men are not the only people to like football. 86% of the women interviewed stated that they watch football matches on TV. If however for the majority, this practice proves only to be occasional (64%), 23% clearly affirm that they “love football and watch every match of the season”. German women prove to be especially passionate, with 26% of the respondents loving football, compared with only 17% of French women deeming the same commitment.

Yes, women watch X-rated movies too


In the 1970’s, pornographic movies were broadcasted without restraint in cinemas; however, with the introduction of the Giscard law in 1975, the general view began to change towards these erotic productions. By 1990, almost all pornographic cinema halls had disappeared, this also being the result of other factors, such as the invention of the VHS cassette tape. Eroticism has thus moved from the public sphere into the private sphere. With the rise of the internet, the pornographic world has seen a rebirth amongst the shelter of households or behind computer screens, in which one can watch whatever they please under an incognito disguise. Do men and women watch the same amount of porn? Do they watch these films for the same reasons? Does the newer generation of women appreciate pornographic films more than their elders? The Womenology marketing lab from the aufeminin.com group has led an exclusive survey with 2302 respondents in order to answer these questions. (1)

L’Oréal: a success story in international marketing to women


Established in 130 countries across five continents, L’Oréal group’s international success represents an international marketing model based on skill, knowledge and an unshakeable reputation. How has L’Oréal created this image and reputation? How has the group won over women around the world?

Luxury & sales force: learn to manage brand ambassadors


Of the top fifteen international luxury brands, seven are French. French brands represent 25% of the world market in luxury personal assets (fashion, accessories, perfume, watches and jewellery), or 212 billion euros (Cabinet Bain & Company – 2012). (1) In this sector, where making the clients’ dreams come true is essential, the sales force plays a vital role. Michaela Merk, a specialist in marketing and international retail, chose to spend 4 years researching the link between the brand and its sales force.  What alliances should be created? What is the best way to manage a sales team so that they embody the brand values? In April 2014 Michaela Merk published a methological book: Luxury Sales Force Management.

“The link between the brand and its sales team is a very close one,” explains Dominique Perrin, non-executive Director of the Richemont group, “management needs to bring the brand to life to the point that it becomes a ‘loved one’ at the heart of the sales team.” (3)

The keys to online shopping for women


« Purchasing, especially online, allows people to feel part of a large community with values at the heart of it, brand values.” These are the words of sociologist Stéphane Hugon whose doctoral research focused on “The social construction of online identity”. (1)

Through the development of online shopping, individuals are discovering a new purchasing experience, one that’s digital, rich in information and community-based. However, do men and women demonstrate the same behaviour when it comes to online shopping?

The democratisation of online shopping

In January 2013, Ifop (the French Institute of Public Opinion) published a survey comparing online shopping and in-store purchases, the results of which highlighted the advantages of online sales sites compared to their “physical” competitors. According to the study, pure plays are no longer considered by shoppers to be marginal players. When they have the choice, around a quarter of French people – and up to 32% of those in the upper socio-professional category – prefer to shop online rather than at traditional distributors.

Dove: the perfect success story in advertising


In 2004 Dove launched a ground breaking worldwide advertising campaign in the beauty industry. The brand created a new way to address their public which aimed to be “real” by getting rid of the complexes that beauty product consumers suffer from. Around 10 years on, how have Dove’s campaigns changed? What lessons can we take away?

2004

Why do brands need media muses?


“In reality, women are more ‘real,’ and not as perfect as Adriana Karembeu. People need reality, they need truth.” These are the words of Nicolas Chomette, head of Black & Gold, a design and strategy company. He adds, “Sometimes we wonder whether the use of muses simply hides a brand’s lack of imagination, and perhaps even their laziness. Have they run out of ideas?” (1) Some brands, like Dove in 2012, have chosen to use consumers as muses. Is it due to a lack of imagination or a way to increase sales? Why do brands use muses?

Are women fighting against stereotypes or internalising them? (1/2)


In society, when we talk about « equality » between men and women, we often think about salaries, careers, or who does the household chores. We don’t however talk so much about equality amongst children when it comes to play, cultural activities and sports. However, the way that children are educated has a lot of influence on the way that gender representations are passed on. Such is evident in the latest film by Guillaume Gallienne « Les Garçons et Guillaume à table! » In cinemas 20th November 2013.

Since female emancipation, people, and women in particular, have continued to fight the injustices of gender relations.

However, stereotypes still exist in society, and are ingrained from a very young age. How can this be explained? This question was asked in a survey conducted in October 2013 on 1284 women by Womenology for aufeminin.com. (1) What kind of stereotypes still exist in family education? Do mums educate girls and boys in the same way? Why do boys rarely play with dolls?