Category Archives: Sectors

It’s generally mothers who teach their daughters how to cook – and in doing so strongly influence their eating patterns, even as adults


A qualitative study led by CREDOC in March 2004, on 26 mother-daughter duos, confirms that the majority of the time, mothers are the ones who introduce their daughters to cooking and to flavours. What’s less intuitive, however, is that these initial basics in cooking will form the dietary habits of girls during their lifetime: lots will continue to feed and cook “like mum”, even after they’ve left the family home…

The first thing the study shows is that while mothers introduce their daughters to cooking, the process of transmitting information is rarely conscious: mothers don’t ”teach” their daughters to cook, instead they make dishes in front of them and allow them to stir a mixture, add spices, etc. While mothers themselves had to help out during their childhood, especially in large families, they haven’t imposed this on their daughters, for whom learning about cooking is done as they go along and not through voluntarist teaching. It’s by watching and imitating that young girls take their first steps in cooking: “With my kids, I did the same as my mum did with me: I didn’t ask them to help, they just got involved if they wanted to,” tells one of the girls.

Beauty and sensuality are significant assets in the job market


For some decades, studies have shown that people who are considered to be physically beautiful are at an advantage in a number of areas, both private and professional. Three recent books confirm this trend by showing that beauty has become a major factor in building a career… but they disagree about the measures to take to wipe out this discrimination.

Source : The Economist.

Beauty facilitates life: this isn’t a dubious statement but a postulate that has been scientifically proven on several occasions. Since 1974, Mr Efran showed in his study « The effect of physical appearance on the judgment of guilt, interpersonal attraction, and severity of recommended punishment in a simulated jury task » that ugly-looking defendants are more severely punished during a trial than those who are considered beautiful. Likewise, attractive-looking people are more likely to gain a place in a queue, benefit from help when they need it, etc.

In the professional field as well, the influence of physical appearance has been recognised for several decades. In 1981, Mr Solomon showed, with supporting experiences, that job applicants’ clothes were often a decisive factor in recruitment (“Dress for success: Clothing Appropriateness and the Efficacy of Role Behavior”).

“Without the internet, I wouldn’t be the woman that I am today”


A meeting with Capucine, the creator of the blog Babillages

How did you think of the idea to create Babillages?

I was 19 and a student in communication and journalism. I started my first internship in women’s press, mainly in the beauty sections. That gave me the desire to do this job so I started a blog on beauty. At this moment in time, I hadn’t really had the opportunity to write in the magazines which I worked for, so the blog seemed to me an obvious way to prove that I was interested in this industry. That’s when I got myself into the game. The internet users are really connected with each other over it. The blog was no longer an advertising space to my potential employers. That was 7 years ago now! Babillages is a great adventure. I have grown up with my blog and the blog has grown too. I am also in the middle of working on a new version of Babillages which will mark a true turning point in my professional life. I want to put forward a much richer experience which I hope would please my readers! My blog will in effect transform itself into a real website…But that’s all I’m going to tell you, patience!

L’Oréal: a success story in international marketing to women


Established in 130 countries across five continents, L’Oréal group’s international success represents an international marketing model based on skill, knowledge and an unshakeable reputation. How has L’Oréal created this image and reputation? How has the group won over women around the world?

Luxury & sales force: learn to manage brand ambassadors


Of the top fifteen international luxury brands, seven are French. French brands represent 25% of the world market in luxury personal assets (fashion, accessories, perfume, watches and jewellery), or 212 billion euros (Cabinet Bain & Company – 2012). (1) In this sector, where making the clients’ dreams come true is essential, the sales force plays a vital role. Michaela Merk, a specialist in marketing and international retail, chose to spend 4 years researching the link between the brand and its sales force.  What alliances should be created? What is the best way to manage a sales team so that they embody the brand values? In April 2014 Michaela Merk published a methological book: Luxury Sales Force Management.

“The link between the brand and its sales team is a very close one,” explains Dominique Perrin, non-executive Director of the Richemont group, “management needs to bring the brand to life to the point that it becomes a ‘loved one’ at the heart of the sales team.” (3)

Dove: the perfect success story in advertising


In 2004 Dove launched a ground breaking worldwide advertising campaign in the beauty industry. The brand created a new way to address their public which aimed to be “real” by getting rid of the complexes that beauty product consumers suffer from. Around 10 years on, how have Dove’s campaigns changed? What lessons can we take away?

2004

Why do brands need media muses?


“In reality, women are more ‘real,’ and not as perfect as Adriana Karembeu. People need reality, they need truth.” These are the words of Nicolas Chomette, head of Black & Gold, a design and strategy company. He adds, “Sometimes we wonder whether the use of muses simply hides a brand’s lack of imagination, and perhaps even their laziness. Have they run out of ideas?” (1) Some brands, like Dove in 2012, have chosen to use consumers as muses. Is it due to a lack of imagination or a way to increase sales? Why do brands use muses?

Are women fighting against stereotypes or internalising them? (1/2)


In society, when we talk about « equality » between men and women, we often think about salaries, careers, or who does the household chores. We don’t however talk so much about equality amongst children when it comes to play, cultural activities and sports. However, the way that children are educated has a lot of influence on the way that gender representations are passed on. Such is evident in the latest film by Guillaume Gallienne « Les Garçons et Guillaume à table! » In cinemas 20th November 2013.

Since female emancipation, people, and women in particular, have continued to fight the injustices of gender relations.

However, stereotypes still exist in society, and are ingrained from a very young age. How can this be explained? This question was asked in a survey conducted in October 2013 on 1284 women by Womenology for aufeminin.com. (1) What kind of stereotypes still exist in family education? Do mums educate girls and boys in the same way? Why do boys rarely play with dolls?

Thierry Mugler makes its customers feel like stars


« If without perfume, we are nothing, without  image, perfume is nothing, » believes Alain Montandon, professor emeritus of General and Comparative Literature. (1) More than just a simple fragrance, perfume evokes a feeling and an image. Using it is therefore very symbolic for women. Fragrances are surrounded by connotations that brands carefully build and manipulate.

To perfect the relationship between consumers and their perfumes, Thierry Mugler pioneered a unique loyalty strategy.

Du Pareil au même: « Made for kids! »


Born from the imagination of theatre designer Simon Bénarousse, who found children’s clothes too simple and boring, the brand “Du Pareil au même” (translation: “six of one, (and) half a dozen of the other”) has always been defined by fun and colourful products. After the brand’s first store opened in 1986, the French success story is now really taking shape. A baby line was launched in 1994 and then a line of shoes in the 2000s, the club card (loyalty program) was launched in 2004 and events take place regularly. By 2013 the brand was present across 32 countries, had 2.5 million subscribers to its loyalty program and opened its 600th store. (1) How has the brand changed the clothing market? How has it developed its strategy? How does it communicate to mums?

The children’s clothing market

As the fastest growing sector of the apparel market, the children’s sector is supported by positive structural factors, including a growing target population, the fact that children change size and shoe size every 6 months until they hit adolescence, the rise in the average age of women when they have their first child (stronger buying power), etc. However, according to the Xerfi institute, it seems to be struggling in the economic context of 2013. Specialists brands are competing with extensions of adult brands (Zara Kids, Mexx Kids, Gap Kids, etc.) who are trying to gain customers from the child sector. (2) This is why DPAM re-launched its marketing strategy, expanding its digital offer amongst other initiatives.