Category Archives: Entertainment & Culture

“Without the internet, I wouldn’t be the woman that I am today”


A meeting with Capucine, the creator of the blog Babillages

How did you think of the idea to create Babillages?

I was 19 and a student in communication and journalism. I started my first internship in women’s press, mainly in the beauty sections. That gave me the desire to do this job so I started a blog on beauty. At this moment in time, I hadn’t really had the opportunity to write in the magazines which I worked for, so the blog seemed to me an obvious way to prove that I was interested in this industry. That’s when I got myself into the game. The internet users are really connected with each other over it. The blog was no longer an advertising space to my potential employers. That was 7 years ago now! Babillages is a great adventure. I have grown up with my blog and the blog has grown too. I am also in the middle of working on a new version of Babillages which will mark a true turning point in my professional life. I want to put forward a much richer experience which I hope would please my readers! My blog will in effect transform itself into a real website…But that’s all I’m going to tell you, patience!

Are women fighting against stereotypes or internalising them? (1/2)


In society, when we talk about « equality » between men and women, we often think about salaries, careers, or who does the household chores. We don’t however talk so much about equality amongst children when it comes to play, cultural activities and sports. However, the way that children are educated has a lot of influence on the way that gender representations are passed on. Such is evident in the latest film by Guillaume Gallienne « Les Garçons et Guillaume à table! » In cinemas 20th November 2013.

Since female emancipation, people, and women in particular, have continued to fight the injustices of gender relations.

However, stereotypes still exist in society, and are ingrained from a very young age. How can this be explained? This question was asked in a survey conducted in October 2013 on 1284 women by Womenology for aufeminin.com. (1) What kind of stereotypes still exist in family education? Do mums educate girls and boys in the same way? Why do boys rarely play with dolls?

Gender Marketing encounters: Thierry Maurice


Interview with Thierry Maurice, CEO of the dating website appart-ages.com

Womenology: Older women represent a very important market for marketers, what are the expectations of this target audience in your opinion?

Yes, because they are more likely to be regaining control over their lives, which inevitably involves the « consumption » of beauty products, travel, dating sites, etc … Older women are not what they were, they don’t want to give up anything, nothing, except giving up… but there is one area in which they don’t express themselves enough, love and sex, despite how far it has come in recent years.

Lego and gender marketing: a strategy under construction


After several years of research on behavioral differences in boys and girls, in January 2012, the Lego brand launched a new range for girls; Lego Friends. How does this strategy work? What affinity has Lego established with girls since its origins? Let’s look back at the brand campaigns that marked great years for the brand.

Lego Friends: a new world for girls

« Heartlake City » is the name given to the imaginary city of toys created by Lego for girls. In this fun and colorful landscape, five friends do their favorite activities: decorating their homes, going to the hairdresser’s, preparing food, and working as vets or karate instructors…

Stephen Knapp, Marketing Director for Lego France explains how design varies in the range: « We interviewed girls and found that for them, the experience starts before the construction itself, they have different needs to boys. They want to make their own world, create models all by themselves (…). The figurines are slightly larger, closer to reality, still to construct, but designed to appeal to girls, who didn’t identify with the boy figurines. The figures are characters whose stories girls are invited to discover, their personalities, their worlds, and of course the friendship that brings them together. «  (2)

Is the Happy Meal toy a « boy toy or a girl toy? »


Created in 1979 in the United States, the Happy Meal menu soon found its audience. Its success is partly due to the famous little toy, originally purchased separately and then included in the menu. From basic gifts such as Frisbees or balls, the toys have become more intricate and their quality has improved. McDonald’s now even offer Disney licensed toys. But children’s enthusiasm for the Happy Meal is also down to McDonald’s’ collaborations with recent movie releases. From “Star Trek » to « Star Wars » to « Despicable Me, » McDonald’s has become an essential communication tool to the film world.

However, it is the « gendered » characteristics of these famous toys which have really built up the reputation of the Happy Meal. There’s no need to ask parents around the world to know that the question asked by Mcdonalds staff; “For a Boy or a Girl?” is notorious.

The Happy Meal as a champion for gender stereotypes

Given as gifts, the toys symbolize affection and an intent to please. They also provide a lot of fun for children. But behind this playful front lies a darker aspect to the toys, linked to socialisation. « (…)As both a cultural instrument and a social learning aid, the toy is a key factor in socialisation. This is without doubt the most established, yet most hidden role of the Happy Meal… This is because the toy both triggers and reflects urban communication in the media and in children’s education. It makes that child a product of the times and outlines successive roles that the child will be expected to take on throughout the different stages of life, » writes sociologist Sandrine Vincent.

An insight into female shoppers in France


Shopping is generally thought of as a typically feminine activity and female consumers have gained the reputation of being shopaholics! However, we are now seeing a number of changes. The economic situation in France has become more complicated in recent years, purchasing power is a worry for many households, and new technology is evolving … How are women responding to these changes? What shopping habits do they have in 2013? Have their expectations and attitudes changed? Are Smartphones and e-commerce now an integral part of their purchases?

In answer to these questions, in June 2013, Unibail-Rodamco launched a Shopping Observatory, in partnership with Ipsos, to try and understand French women and their shopping patterns, their motivations, what holds them back, their indulgences, as well as future trends. (1)

TV content and identity construction in children


Sarah Alzieu

In the past, socialisation of young children only occurred in certain situations, including the family unit, at school and amongst peers. However, the increasing availability of television and internet access has changed this traditional pattern. Whereas children’s environments generally used to be controlled by parents and schools, nowadays children have unlimited access to media content. This development has brought about a number of concerns: the feeling of a loss of control could lead to potential media intrusion or invasion on daily life… Various groups have attempted to take control of this problem. For example, the European Council provides clear, standardised guidelines which allow guardians to control and avoid any potentially negative media influences on children. However, the amount of freedom that the small screen allows is still widely disputed and feared by the public.

Is Television an accessible resource or a threat to education? 

In recent years, the number of murders committed by teenagers has multiplied, and it is commonly believed that the killers may be influenced by excessive consumption of ultra-violent media content. This belief has been challenged by philosopher Marie-José Mondzain in his book « Can imagery kill?” In the book he disputes the idea that exposure to violent content can directly influence behaviour. This imitation theory is based on the assumption that teenagers have no ability to put information into context or the capacity to take information in any way other than imitating it. The fear of such images does not just concern video games, but almost every type of visual content, whether it is reality (TV news) or fiction (cartoons, advertising…). Children’s TV programs are therefore perceived as potentially dangerous.

Is the future of wine feminine?


Interview with Régine Le Coz, President and Founder of « WOMEN AND WINE OF THE WORLD »

Womenology: What are your plans for 2013?

Régine LE COZ: We are currently finalizing the 2012 award-winning recipes on our website clubfemmesetvinsdumonde.com by the end of the month, all recipes should be made and put in value and award-winning wines in 2012.

This month, we are launching in Monaco, the 7th edition of Women and Wines of the world femmesetvinsdumonde.com and the third edition of Women and Spirits of the World femmesetspiritueuxdumonde.com which has the distinction of being a biennial. This took place on the 24th, 25th and 26th of April 2013 the competition was, of course, followed by the Grand Concours Packaging for award-winning spirits and wines.

Women’s Digital Entertainment


Movie fans, smartphone users, tablet addicts… women have adopted the digital culture. However, although the new media (smartphones, tablets) has entered into their everyday lives, they have not surrendered their usual cultural practices (films, television, and reading).

Unisex media behavior

The lives of women differ from that of men. The Media study “in Life de Médiamétrie” published in 2012 makes it clear that the lives of women are more marked by “routine activities” than men’s; they vary between activities such as personal care, taking meals, shopping, relationships with family and friends, recreation (taking a walk, going to the theater), or domestic activities. In contrast, the « routine activities » of men are primarily work or studies. (1)

Gender Marketing Encounters: Laure Baume


CLUB MEDITERRANEE Interview
With Laure Baume, Marketing & Customer Relations Manager in France, Belgium and Switzerland

March 30th 2012

Laure Baume, Marketing & Customer Relations Manager in France, Belgium and Switzerland

Laure Baume, Marketing & Customer Relations Manager in France, Belgium and Switzerland

Agence L / Womenology
What is the percentage of decision-making women for purchases of Club Med holidays?

Laure Baume
Women represent 70% of purchasing decisions. They decide to come to Club Med, not because they don’t know how to organise a holiday themselves but because they want a bit of time for themselves. We also have 30% of single-parent families. Studies we’ve led show that men (separated, divorced or living on their own with their children) come to Club Med because they can focus on the essential, their relationship with the children they don’t see very often, because Club Med takes care of all the material aspects. It’s a really important benefit that Club Med provides.
But active women, whether single parents or not, are our main target market. Club Med offers them moments when they can be sure of keeping all the family happy, and moments when they can take time for themselves, do some sport, go to a party, etc… all the while being able to make the most of time spent with their children. Club Med has this ability to reunite all of these elements in one week.