Archives par mot-clef : shoe

“Family is Sacred”! Eram Gives New Faces to Mothers


With its advertising campaign “family is sacred”, Eram counts on irony to twist advertising clichés about the family unit.

By showing families with gay parents or a “cougar” mother in a relationship with a younger man, the brand has distinguished itself.

It has been an original and provocative initiative which has disturbed the most conservative people in France.

 

A campaign which reflects social mutations

“As my two mums say, family is sacred,” announces a mixed-race little girl surrounded by two women with clear skin. “As my mum and her boyfriend, who could be my older brother say, family is sacred,” claims another little girl who is fair-haired. With stepfamilies, lesbian couples, “cougar” mums in relationships with younger men, or adopted children, identities are multiplying. The figure of the mother may be heterosexual or homosexual, family can be “reconstituted”, but the spirit of family remains. This idea surprises and calls out to people in an advertising world which doesn’t always echo social changes. But more than merely being surprising, this ad provokes. It plays on the wavelengths between the expression “family is sacred”, which refers to traditional and religious values, and images reflecting the new family structures. Especially by making the kids be the ones talking, Eram insists on the fact that their lives are not destabilised by these social mutations.

Christian Louboutin, the man with the red soles


A recent aufeminin.com survey revealed that a pair of Louboutins are one of the 5 fashion items women dream of owning. The iconic red soles seem to hold a special spot for women, just as much, or more so, than men…

« The man with the red soles » has never stopped breaking pre-established codes. It was his impertinence that launched his career in fact: having seen a sign at the entrance to a museum that banned stiletto heels in order to preserve the wooden floor, he decided to set about creating such sensual shoes. Aged 16 and armed with his sketches, he knocked on the door of music halls, but without success. Instead of giving up, he decided to get some training at the professionals: Chanel, Yves Saint-Laurent then Roger Vivier… before finally launching his own brand in 1992.

Carel – Subtle Femininity


The Carel shoe brand was established in 1952. Using entirely French manufacturing and having very Parisian values – i.e. being chic, having timeless style and being very comfortable – makes them popular with outlets in upscale neighbourhoods of Paris and makes them 8 million Euros annually through sales. Recently its founders sold the company to Frédérique Picard and Monia Ghazouani, who promised to preserve the subtle and refined spirit that made the brand successful.

Women and their heels


They’ve become a symbol of femininity and sensuality that nearly all men say they appreciate. Yet a recent study led by researchers at Northumbria University concluded that the majority of men are unable to remember if a woman who’s just passed in front of them was wearing heels or not; they only notice her overall look… and so a myth falls apart. Does this mean that women should stop damaging their feet in unwearable stilettos? You wouldn’t bet on it!

It’s good news for women who are reluctant to inflict 4-inch heels on their feet just to follow the fashion set by the series Sex and the City: men don’t notice the type of that women wear. One of the researchers, Dr Neave concludes: « Women are spending money on high heels, which can be dangerous, presumably to make themselves look good and add to what nature has given them […]But scientifically we know very little about this.« 

Bagllerina, fold-up flats to carry around in your bag


Like all active women, Christine Natkin, an owner of a communications firm, often slid a pair of flats into her purse to put them on instead of her heels at the end of the day.

In 2009, tired of always carrying around bulky shoes, she created her own solution: foldable flats that are lightweight and easy to store in any purse. Now sold online and in a few Parisian stores including the Galeries Lafayette, soon they will be available in foreign countries and with new styles, including a secret concept that Ms. Natkin is patenting with the Ecole Nationale des Arts et Métiers.

This now begs the question: where to put often bulkier high heels once women decide to get comfortable?

Jimmy Choo treasure hunt in the streets of London


The Jimmy Choo shoe brand has used the new possibilities offered by a new generation of social networks based on geolocation. Foursquare allows you to find out where the members of your network are, at anytime of the day, thanks to the GPS integrated in smartphones. You can therefore meet up with a friend who happens to be just a few blocks away from you.

Based on this principle, last April, Jimmy Choo launched a treasure hunt in London (Choo Hunt).

The idea was to track down a brand representative who checked in on Foursquare into some of the most famous places in London. He published hints and tips about his hideaway on Facebook and Twitter. This representative carried a pair of Jimmy Choo shoes with him: if you could track the shoes down and catch them while he was still checked in at a venue, then they were yours.

Two Facebook and Twitter pages were created for the occasion.

Swap your shoes with Mosquito


The La Chose agency created an ad campaign called « Troc de Pompes » (shoe swapping) to promote the launch of the Spring-Summer 2010 collection of the shoe brand Mosquito. In April 2010, a Mosquito Bus drove around Paris offering female passers-by the opportunity to swap their shoes for a pair of Mosquito shoes. 500 pairs of shoes were thus exchanged.
Hostesses handed out flyers to passers-by, indicating the bus route. The shoes that Mosquito collected were given to charities.

A dedicated website was launched for the occasion with video footage of the event showing the bus’s route through the city.

This event played a major role in the rebirth of the brand’s declining image.